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Greater Everglades Landscape Dynamics

photo of a group of palm trees in a prairie
Project Investigators: John W. Jones, Greg Desmond, Brenda Gollaher, David Kirtland, Janet Tilley

Project Personnel: Annette Elmore, Natlee Hernandez-Guevara

Project Start Date: 2001 End Date: 2014

Recent Funding: (FY12) USGS GE PES, (FY08) USGS GE PES, USGS LRS Program, (FY07) USGS GE PES, USGS LRS Program, (FY06) USGS GE PES, (FY05) USGS GE PES, USGS/BRD


Summary

The objective of this research is to develop and apply innovative remote sensing and geographic information system techniques to map the distribution of vegetation and related hydrologic variables such as evaporation through space and over time.

For more information, please see the Tides and Inflows in the Mangrove Ecotone (TIME) Model Development Project Webpage and the Everglades Depth Estimation Network (EDEN) Ground Elevation Model web page.

Multiple south Florida stakeholders from government, private industry, environmental, and citizen sectors have begun collaborating in an effort to return the Florida Everglades system to its natural state. Research into the measurement and modeling of water movement and other hydrologic processes have therefore been identified as a primary science need in support of Everglades restoration. In order to accurately simulate surface water hydrology in South Florida, the variation in vegetation cover and the role vegetation plays in removal of surface water, resistance to surface water flow, and water quality, is necessary. The objective of this research is to develop and apply innovative remote sensing and geographic information system techniques to map the distribution of vegetation and related hydrologic variables such as evaporation through space and over time. This work will provide insights regarding the role south Florida vegetation plays in the redistribution of rainfall and surface flow inputs as well as the cycling of nutrients and other materials in the Everglades waters. It will contribute to our understanding of hydrology at large scales. Finally, it will lay the foundation for monitoring restoration impacts on Everglades flora. These benefits are vital in building the understanding required to properly monitor, simulate, and manage the unique Everglades wetland resource.

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Script last updated: 30 January 2014 @ 12:44 PM by THF. Record creator: BJM. Record last updated by: KP.